Refusal to Cooperate

What if someone refuses to do the work/assignment?

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6 Responses to Refusal to Cooperate

  1. Karl Mason says:

    Don’t lose your temper. Don’t get angry. use the 5-5-5 rule, breathe in for 5 seconds, hold it for 5 seconds then breathe out for 5 seconds. Then speak to them, you really don’t want to do it in front of an audience, ask for the student to speak to you outside the classroom, don’t worry about having to get somebody above you to get them outside with you. – Once outside the member of SLT needs to allow you to control the situation, have a frank discussion with the pupil, explain why you are doing the work you are doing, the outcomes, what you expect, and see if the pupil wishes to cooperate then, if not then the SLT need to remove the pupil while you ensure the rest of the group achieve their targets.

  2. mshelft says:

    Here are more “What If”s:

    What if a student is defiant?

    What if someone throws something?

    What if someone becomes injured/faints?

    What if a girl needs a pad?

    What if a student is dressed inappropriately?

    What if a student has inappropriate marks on binders/notebooks? What if students draw inappropriate things?

    What if students need to drink water?

    What if students write on the desk?

    What if students take a long time to go to the bathroom?

    What if a student comes to you about another teacher?

    What if a student talks about you behind your back?

    What if a parent wants to take a student out of your class?

    What if students are doing hw for other classes during your class?

    What if students start grooming themselves during class?

    What if someone gets in trouble with someone else’s property?

    What if students don’t eat lunch/breakfast?

    What if you have students who are not in the menta space to learn when they come into your room?

    What if someone throws something and it hits you…?

    What if the principal comes into your class?

    What if you need to go to the bathroom during class/you start to feel sick during class?

    What if technology doesn’t work?

    What if two students come in with an issue from outside of the classroom?

    What if two students refuse to work together?

    What if students have allergies to supplies in your class?
    ** If you allow food in our classroom, put any food allergies as a question on the getting to know you survey**

    What if students can’t see?

    What if YOU run out of resources (paper, etc.)?

    What if students forget the needed materials?

    What if students miss major assignments? Absence policy.

  3. Susan says:

    Mshelft: I assume that you’ve made this list because you are interested in the answers…. Here are mine, with my experience, and with the policies that we have in place at my school.

    What if a student is defiant? Depending on what you’re doing at the moment, choose to ignore or to deal with it immediately. If you ignore, be sure you make the next decision of dealing with it later (after class, before the next class) or never dealing with it. If you deal with the defiance immediately, do it privately, just outside the classroom door. Never get into an argument in front of the class.

    What if someone throws something? See previous answer.

    What if someone becomes injured/faints? Help them up, ask about how they are. If any doubt, send them to the office with another student as accompaniment.

    What if a girl needs a pad? Let her take the hall pass to go and get one.

    What if a student is dressed inappropriately? Address the student privately, ask them to go put on another shirt/sweater.

    What if a student has inappropriate marks on binders/notebooks? What if students draw inappropriate things? Depending on you level of tolerance for such things, choose to ignore or deal with it privately with the student.

    What if students need to drink water? Let them take the hall pass and get water. Remind them that they should be getting water at break.

    What if students write on the desk? Speak to them privately, tell them it’s not respectful to deface property. If it happens again, have them clean the desks. (This assumes you have a seating chart and can know with confidence who wrote on the desk)

    What if students take a long time to go to the bathroom? Depending on the situation, address it with the student privately or ignore it.

    What if a student comes to you about another teacher? Ask them to speak to their parents and/or administration. Go and speak to administration yourself.

    What if a student talks about you behind your back? I don’t know, I wonder how you would know this.

    What if a parent wants to take a student out of your class? At my school, that is impossible.

    What if students are doing hw for other classes during your class? Speak privately to the student, remove the homework for the remainder of the period (I give it back at the end of the period), and then ask yourself the tough question: what about your class is making students do homework from other classes?

    What if students start grooming themselves during class? Speak privately to them.

    What if someone gets in trouble with someone else’s property? By this do you mean steals another student’s property? If so, this is for the administration to deal with.

    What if students don’t eat lunch/breakfast? If a student will not eat, refer them to guidance/administration so that they are aware. There are many reasons why students don’t eat.

    What if you have students who are not in the menta space to learn when they come into your room? Wow, that happens every day. Two things seem to make a slight difference for me. Having work for the student to do immediately in a quite environment is important for them to get to that mental space. Also, consistency of the routine with interesting pieces thrown in helps.

    What if someone throws something and it hits you…? This has never happened to me. My first response is that it could have been an accident, so look surprised and the thing will get straightened out. If it is intentional somehow, the student needs to go to the office.

    What if the principal comes into your class? My door is always open, and I am waiting for the day that my principal comes to my class. It hasn’t happened yet. The vice principal comes by to give out detentions.

    What if you need to go to the bathroom during class/you start to feel sick during class? If you need to go to the bathroom, ask a passing teacher to stay in your class for a moment, while you run to the bathroom. If you feel sick, like you cannot continue, send a student to get someone, or buzz the office.

    What if technology doesn’t work? Always test the material before the class. Always have a backup plan.

    What if two students come in with an issue from outside of the classroom? Get the class started, hold them at the door, speak to them privately. If the can come it, let them. If it’s huge, send them to the office.

    What if two students refuse to work together? I have groups of four for the term, and switch each term. I tell students that it’s important that they work together, and that they try to get along.

    What if students can’t see? Can’t see the board? Move them to the front.

    What if YOU run out of resources (paper, etc.)? Send a student with the hall pass to get some. After class, reflect on how you ran out resources and plan for it not to happen again.

    What if students forget the needed materials? Remind them that they need it, let them go and get it.

    What if students miss major assignments? Speak to the student privately, figure out what is the problem. Set a new date. If not, call home and figure it out with them.

  4. misscalcul8 says:

    A refusal to cooperate is disrespect. Deal with it quickly, it’s catching. Depending on your relationship with the student, talk to them outside of class, call their parents, or send them to the office.

  5. Teens says:

    I’m a trainee teacher teaching language. I had an incident recently with a defiant adult student. I asked her and her fellow student to move to the front to join two other students and fill in the empty chairs. She defiantly said NO! and would not move. I asked her in a strict tone to move over which she reluctantly did. Unfortunately I said to her is there a problem in front of the class then she was silent. This student is a passenger and will not participate or work with others but wants to sit in the same seat with the same person. On one or two occasions I have spoken to her after the class in private and asked her if she understands the lessons (trying to find out the barriers) no response. I gave up eventually incase she thought I was picking on her.
    Can you give me any extended advice.

  6. Zach says:

    In my experience, avoiding confrontation is essential in these situations – especially confrontation in front of the whole class. It’s never easy, but it is doable. I’ve seen teachers even say things like, “I’m sorry – it’s totally my fault but I need you to move seats,” which sometimes confuses the students into moving. Alternatively, rather than asking if she understands the lessons, you might just ask, “Is everything ok?” I’ve found that opening up and sending the message of, “I care about you and your well-being first, but I also need you to be a productive member of this classroom,” can get to a student better than anything that can be perceived as a demand such as “I need you to move.”

    In the end, there is no magic bullet (at least that I know of), and I still struggle with these issues on a daily basis, but these are some of the things that have worked for me.

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